Bottle Caps for HPLC Mobile Phase Bottles

Please note that there are three holes in the top of the cap which are threaded for use with standard low pressure male nuts as shown in the image. This cap has 2 different size through holes which allows for two different size tubing or different venting while the other size (shown) has one size […]

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Can I Use Acetone as a Mobile Phase Solvent in ANP? – FAQ

If you are using LCMS, the simple answer is yes but pH is also something to consider. Acetone has a high UV cutoff and therefore can be a problem for UV detection. However, this is not a problem when using LCMS or ELS detectors such as the Corona CAD. You can use Acetone to replace Acetonitrile […]

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Can I use benzene as a mobile phase solvent in HPLC?

Benzene can be used as an HPLC solvent in theory. It is compatible with standard HPLC instrumentation and will not damage an HPLC column. However, we would not recommend using this solvent for two main reasons. First, it is strongly UV-absorbing so would not be suitable for UV-based detection methods. Second, it is a known carcinogen and therefore […]

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Can you use a Sparging Stone for Removal of Dissolved Oxygen? FAQ

Yes, Sparging Stones have been shown to remove dissolved Oxygen (or CO2) from Water or Wine. The efficiency of Sparging is influenced by many factors, such as Bubble Size, Contact Time between the Gas and Wine, Temperature of the Wine, Gas Pressure, and the Flow Rate of Gas in relation to the Flow Rate of […]

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Use Teflon bottles for A and B solvents in negative ion mode LCMS.

You will want to have both your A and B solvents (aqueous and organic) in Teflon mobile phase reservoir bottles. The reason for using these bottles is that sodium present in borosilicate glass mobile phase reservoirs can lead to issues for anionic analytes in negative ion mode LCMS. These include phosphates and organic acids but […]

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Why is Nylon called Nylon? FAQ

According to the “Answers Corporation” website, nylon was developed at both New York and London, simultaneously. However, it has also been stated that the letters “nyl” were arbitrary and the “on” was copied from the suffixes of other fibers such as cotton and Rayon. A later publication by DuPont (Context, vol. 7, no. 2, 1978) […]

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